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Posted on June 26, 2017

Is It Necessary To Hire A REALTOR To Buy Or Sell A Home In California?

Our goal as Realtors or Real Estate Agents is to provide each and every customer with the finest real estate service based on the highest standard of ethics, values, and client care. Realtors in Elk Grove, CA accomplish this by placing our customer's interests first. This is our mission. We will live up to this in everything we do. Our success will always be measured by the happiness and the loyalty of our clients.

Selling A House

A Realtor sales associate can help you determine your buying power. You need to know how much house you can afford before you start the search. Your sales associate will provide detailed information on properties that meet your criteria from the Multiple Listing Service and other information resources only available to REALTORS®.

Only real estate licensees who are members of the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® are properly called REALTORS®. REALTORS® subscribe to a strict code of ethics and are expected to maintain a higher level of knowledge of the process of buying and selling real estate. They are committed to treat all parties to a transaction honestly. REALTOR® business practices are monitored at local board levels.

When you find a property you like, your Realtor sales associate will help you develop an offer including the offering price and other terms. The sales agent will advise you about the importance of a home inspection and other inspections required by law in your area. Your real estate agent is there to assist you throughout the buying process.

Buying home/property can be an exciting experience, whether this is your first purchase or one of many. The key to a successful purchase is working with an industry leader who knows the market and area you are interested in. Realtors are experts in their field and pride themselves on having a keen working knowledge of the real estate market. This is the competitive edge you want on your side when making your next real estate purchase. Realtors will make your buying experience an easy one by providing you with 100% buyer representation every step of the way.

When working with a team of Realtors who KNOW the local market, they can tell you which are the best buys, which homes are over-priced, and which homes will result in great resales one day will save you time, effort, money and stress.

Why list with a California REALTOR?

They have the experience and knowledge it takes to get your home sold at top dollar, no matter what the news may report about the real estate market. A good Realtor and her team of specialists will guide you through the entire process and offer valuable tips to consider if you are thinking about buying or selling your home.

Finding a Realtor or real estate agent in California is only the first step to buying or selling a house, but it's a crucial one. It's important that you don't pass up your dream home because you didn't know the conditions of the contract.

What Questions Do I Ask My California Realtor?

House Finder

To avoid “buying a pig in a poke,” buyers have long demanded the closing on a home purchase be contingent upon a satisfactory inspection by a home inspection firm. In many parts of our country, we’re now experiencing a strong sellers’ real estate market and sellers often receive more than one purchase offer on the same day for their home. In this environment, buyers are rethinking the home inspection requirement. Is this a good idea? To Inspect or Not To Inspect Clearly, if a seller got two offers and one requires a home inspection be done, most sellers will choose the non-inspection offer with all other things being equal. So, a home inspection requirement can put you at a competitive disadvantage. Still, are you willing to risk purchasing a home that has some fundamental, expensive problems? What if you purchase the home and subsequently learn plumbing under the floors must replaced? What if the repair costs $10,0000? One option may be to include a provision in your purchase offer that provides for a home inspection done for informational purposes only. That way, settlement under your offer is not conditioned upon the inspection. It would not provide you with the option of amending the contract to have the seller make repairs, nor would it provide a way for you to void the contract should serious problems be uncovered. Should serious problems be discovered, however, the seller is bound to know the deal will be in jeopardy. For that reason, even an “informational” home inspection won’t look as good to her as a contract with no requirement for a home inspection. Another option you might consider in lieu of a home inspection is a sub rosa inspection. Instead of using James Bond for spying, you could ask a friend working in the construction or engineering field to walk through the house with you. The goal, of course, is to look for any glaring “red flags” that are deal killers. If your friend doesn’t see anything disturbing, you can then write a clean contract offer without contingencies. Sellers love no contingency sales. The chances are good that you’ll get the home you want, but still have a some assurance there isn’t anything seriously wrong with the property. There is no one right answer when it comes to deciding on home inspections. Each buyer has to ask himself how much risk he is willing to take. If you are the only party making an offer, demand an inspection. If you are one of many potential buyers, well, you are going to have determine your comfort level. Others can provide information, but the decision is yours.

What Does A Real Estate Agent Do For The Buyer?

Find A House

When buying and selling homes, the property purchase is often subject to a satisfactory home inspection being done. Now and then, a home inspection uncovers severe structural problems. Here’s an example of a situation in an upscale neighborhood. Severe Structural Problems Does the buyer walk away when there are serious structural problems? Yes, but not always. A lot depends on the constraints facing the buyer (are they relocating to start a new job, or just “moving up” in the same general area?) and on how much the buyer likes the property. The attitude, maturity level, communication skills, and flexibility of both buyer and seller also make a huge difference. It’s easy to see a deal blowing up in this situation. Let me tell you about a situation I saw that actually worked out. Structural Problems – Upscale Neighborhood The first involved two professional couples and a house one couple wanted to sell and the other wanted to buy in an established, up-scale neighborhood. The house was a colonial style, all brick, very traditional house built about 15 years ago using top of the line materials. The kitchen and bathrooms had been modernized and upgraded within the past 3 years. Top of the line materials (marble, ceramic tile, and granite) were again used. The house was located on an acre lot that sloped gently down to the street in the front. About 10 feet from the right side of the house, the lot sloped steeply away to a pretty stream. The lot backed to a treed area of a beautifully maintained, historic estate owned by a university and open to the public on a fee-paying basis. The home inspector noticed that the chimney on the right end of the house was pulling away from the house. It was about 2 inches away at the top, but the bottom was still attached. In the basement, there was some cracking along the wall the chimney was on. The home inspector would not certify the house as structurally sound, but recommended that an engineering firm take a look at it. The buyer asked the seller to have an engineering study done. The seller was upset but didn’t go to pieces. Something was causing the chimney to pull away, so they called in an engineer. For legal reasons, the sellers also needed to understand what the problem was. The engineer determined that shrink-swell soil was causing serious foundation problems. They recommended digging down a lot further than the original footers and constructing an elaborate new support system. The sellers agreed to do it and the buyers agreed to delay closing until the work was completed. Thirty thousand dollars later (out of the sellers’ pocket), the transaction closed. In Closing When considering the above example, what is the moral? If you keep a cool head and look for solutions, structural problems need not be a deal killer.


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